How to Remove a Delta Kitchen Faucet

How to Remove a Delta Kitchen Faucet

Anthony Barnes

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Delta faucets are some of the most popular kitchen faucets that you can currently find out there.

They have been making our kitchen utilities for almost 70 years at this point, and that experience is easy to see in almost any of their products.

They’re reliable, relatively easy to install and come in a wide variety of styles that can fit almost any kitchen.

However, sometimes issues do arise when it comes to our kitchen faucets. Perhaps a fastening has come loose, maybe the pressure in the faucet has completely failed, and no water will now come out of it.

For whatever reason, sometimes our utilities break down, and they need to be replaced. And that also means removing your delta kitchen faucet (handle).

And if you don’t have the time, or even the patience, to wait for a professional to come and do it. That means it falls on your shoulders to get it out.

Fortunately, it is far from impossible to do this for your faucet. If you have the right tools and know-how, removing it yourself will not only be easy but be another skill that you can add to your belt.

In this article, we are going to explain what you need to do to remove a delta kitchen faucet yourself, as well as some of the tools that you will likely need to do this task on your own.

Are Delta Faucets Difficult To Remove?

Before doing this for the first time, you may be worried that doing something like this, removing a faucet without professional help, is incredibly difficult, or worse, downright dangerous to do alone.

However, so long as you take the right measure before starting, it is not only relatively safe to do this on your faucet, but is surprisingly easy.

The delta faucet product is one of the company’s simplest that they sell, which means that removing it should not be too difficult, even for someone relatively inexperienced when it comes to adjusting and moving fixtures like this.

What Tools You Will Need To Remove A Delta Kitchen Faucet

One of the things that often intimidates people from trying to remove their faucets themselves, is the often large number of complex tools that you will need to remove them.

Fortunately, this is where the simplicity of a delta faucet comes into play. Not only does it mean that removal is relatively simple when compared to other similar products, but you’ll need very few tools to do it.

In most cases, all you will need to do this is some type of sturdy but simple wrench, the model number of your delta faucet, and a guide to help you through it.

Well, we have the guide here, and the model number shouldn’t be tricky to find, so grab a wrench and let’s get started!

Turn Off All Water To The Faucet

Okay, time to begin.

The very first thing that you are going to need to do is to turn off all water, both hot and cold, that is going to the faucet in question.

You don’t want a massive, huge wet mess on your hands, after all!

Shutting off the water to your kitchen can be done in most homes by closing two valves that lead to your kitchen sink, each one responsible for regulating the flow of hot and cold water to your faucets.

How to Remove a Delta Kitchen Faucet

If you cannot find these valves, then you can always simply turn off the water mains in your home for a short period.

Make sure you have a towel under the faucet, though, as some residual water is likely to still flow out.

How to Remove a Delta Kitchen Faucet

Once the water supply has been cut off, you can then start to physically disconnect the supply hoses that lead to your faucet.

To do this, you’ll want to find two screws that are found on those supply hoses, and unscrew them.

Ideally, you should loosen and unscrew the screw that is further up first. Because there is often a thread that connects them, you may find that the second screw starts to come loose at the same time.

To avoid this, you can hold the second lower screw in place with a second wrench if you have one handy.

Unscrew Your Faucet’s Securing Bolt Or Retaining Plate

With the hoses disconnected, you can then start to remove the items that are keeping your delta faucet secured in place. These can either be a retaining plate or a securing bolt.

What exactly they are for your delta faucet might vary depending on your exact model.

Many of them, including the delta, like to use securing bolts, as they are better at stabilizing and securing your sink.

Unfortunately for you, this can make them tricky to remove, however, and may need a longer necked wrench.

It may be tricky to do this part on your own, as the amount of water these bolts get exposed to over time can cause them to rust in place, making it next to impossible to make them budge.

If you are unsure about unscrewing these bolts yourself, then do not hesitate to call an expert like a plumber to do this.

Better t be done right, than to risk breaking something that will be more difficult to fix.

Lifting And Removing Your Faucet

So, everything has now been disconnected, so that leaves only one thing to do.

With no attachments holding it in place, it shouldn’t be too difficult to simply lift the delta faucet (see also ‘How To Fix A Delta Faucet That Still Leaks After Replacing The Cartridge‘) out from its socket.

Make sure you have a bucket handy to hold it over, in case there is any water left inside!

Conclusion

If you have made it this far, congratulations, you have managed to remove it all by yourself! Take pride at this moment, as you appreciate your own handiwork!

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By Anthony Barnes

Anthony Barnes is the founder of Water Heater Hub and a second-generation plumber by profession. Before developing Water Heater Hub, Anthony Barnes was a full-time plumber, and he has undertaken a wide variety of projects over the decades. As a second-generation plumber, it was easy for Anthony to get used to the technicalities of all from a tender age